Tag: artists

Welcome, Sunday readers. As you know, I’ve been preparing new art for the Arts off 84 art crawl coming up over Labor Day weekend. Well, I’m mostly ahead of schedule for once. I still have three paintings in process, four sketches that I might work up, and some larger pieces out in the shop drying. Oh, and there are plenty of older pieces to choose from as well. Yes! Fist pump.

 

Art - 2017 MEFuller 20170813_171111

Enjoy your week.

#art #painting #acrylics

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Not much to report this week. Just making a mess as I build the base for my Arts off 84 paintings. Themes are Relationships in Love, Conflicts in Nature, and some miscellaneous oddball images that strike my fancy.

Charcoal Sketch - Fox and Hare

Hope you’ll come out to the show on Labor Day weekend. You’ll get a taste of Minnesota’s Northland for sure.

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Week 30. Cirenaica with Nickolas Butler

This week I will be in residency at Cirenaica, outside of Eau Claire, WI, with author Nickolas Butler and ten other fiction writers. This will be my first residency experience. I’m grateful to have been accepted. I’m eager to work and critique among other writers, off by ourselves in the wilds of Wisconsin farmland – eating, drinking, sleeping, talking, and working fiction.

Nickolas Butler, credit: Chippewa Valley Writer's Guild

Nickolas Butler. Photo credit: Chippewa Valley Writer’s Guild

Before I go much further, I have to thank the Cirenaica Residency Coordinator and author, B. J. Hollars, for his accommodating nature. It is a fact, friends, that we retirees have likely developed certain lifestyle sensitivities and limitations. We don’t want to stop ourselves from enjoying the most that life has to offer but face it, some of our choices may be relegated to the senior menu. B. J. – who I originally thought through email exchanges was a woman in her mid-fifties – is a bright and friendly young man who would do well in the hospitality industry. As my mother used to advise me, artists must always have a real skill to fall back on.

B. J. Hollars Photo credit: B. J. Hollars

B. J. Hollars Photo credit: B. J. Hollars

Listen to his podcast and be charmed. And listen to Nickolas Butler read from “Shotgun Lovesongs,” within the stunning review by Janet Maslin March of the New York Times.

I didn’t know that artist residencies were “a thing” when I stepped into my retirement career as a writer. Some people, I understand, spend their retirement jumping from cruise ship to cruise ship, or house sitting for professors on sabbatical in college towns. Others, writer and artist others, can be mapped across residencies – coast to coast – in country villages to western-ranging dude ranches.

Some residencies are in-house, pay-your-way workshops, offering teaching opportunities from an established artist. Some will invite you to stay as the artist in residency and provide a small stipend for expenses. All will feed you and house you and teach you in a pod of artists, charging the air you breathe with creative fire.

Length of stay varies. Do your research. Apply liberally.

A note on Cirenaica

The Chippewa Valley Writers Guild is pleased to partner with Cirenaica for our second year of summer residencies!  Nestled on 43 acres of hills, farmland, and forest near the quaint village of Fall Creek, Wisconsin, our residencies promise participants of all levels and genres an intensive yet rejuvenating experience amidst an inspiring backdrop.

Next week’s topic: Probably a review of the Nickolas Butler’s Theory and Practice of Fiction Residency

See you back here next Sunday (or some day during the week). Would you like to keep up with the Greyhairs Rising community? Sign up for the latest updates.

 

 

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You’ve all heard about – or lived through – the cold and snow and ice of Minnesota. It’s the land of endless winter popped by 3 months of summer that brings blowdown storms, tornadoes, giant mosquitoes, and biting black flies. It’s all true. But we also have, and I thank our Minnesota State Legislators (Legacy Amendment funds) for this, a supportive arts community through the Minnesota State Arts Board, Springboard for the Arts, and regional arts councils.

By the way, fellow Minnesotans, be sure to click the link to the Minnesota State Legislators. That will take you to the Legacy Funding Committee. Take time, please, to contact these legislators to tell them how arts funding is needed and thank them for their support.

Springboard for the Arts

I attended a series of 5 classes, offered by Springboard at no charge and presented in my local library, April through May. The title of the group of classes was “Work of Art. Business Skills for Artists.”

I had not planned to attend since I had been a freelance graphic designer for the better part of thirty years. I thought I knew… well, I didn’t. From a review of how to tailor the artist resume to legal considerations, pricing and time management, to funding options, I left with knowledge about how-to and artist resources, to build my retirement career into a solid retirement business.

I strongly urge you to visit the website and explore all it has to offer – even if you aren’t a Minnesotan. Download the 2017 class catalog pdf and dive into

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Creative Exchange, practical, artist-created toolkits to spark change and stories to inspire connection.

As with most things, 90% of achievement is powered by our own efforts. Not everyone is equally equipped for the challenges our goals require. Get help from a friend – you’ve got one in Springboard for the Arts!

Next week’s topic: (depends… it’s summer in Minnesota.)

See you back here next Sunday (or some day during the week). Would you like to keep up with the Greyhairs Rising community? Sign up for the latest updates.

 

 

 

 

 

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Last week the topic was Support Other Artists. The content must have been of little interest to readers since the readership was WAY down. Wow! What does that say about us as a creative group? “Maybe, I told myself, “everybody’s distracted by the approach of spring and infected with spring fever.”

It’s been a long, long winter for those of us in the northern states. The early spring months have brought little in the way of sunshine and consistently warm temperatures. I could see my backyard covered in six inches of snow by tomorrow. (Groan.)

We’ve been here before, in every aspect of our lives, in a place where we aren’t inspired to go forward and we certainly have no heart to help others. So this is a good – no, great – week to talk about social media. We use social media because it’s social. We can interact with others and get responses. The interaction makes us feel good – usually.

Sometimes, depending on what we see on social media, we don’t feel better. That’s something we have to pay attention to and get it under control! As artists, we especially need to pay attention to what we are doing and giving away on social media before making one more social media post.

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Social Media for artists. the good and the bad.

I just completed a course offered by Springboard for the Arts on Legal Considerations for Artists. I have been self-employed as a graphic artist/designer/copywriter – you name it – for much of my professional career. I didn’t think I needed this course, but what could it hurt?

This was an excellent class and a terrific reminder to

  1. Know the law and
  2. Follow the law and
  3. Get help with the law

Our instructor, Naomi RaMona Schliesman, did not offer legal advice since she’s not a lawyer – she didn’t even offer an opinion. She did direct us to resources to research our needs as artists to protect ourselves, our work, and how we work as we work for others as freelancers and by commission.

One thing I knew (I knew this) and ignored every single day that I posted artwork on this blog or on other social media platforms – Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr, etc. – is that many social media platforms’ Terms and Agreements assign your rights to your content to them by use. I went home and thought about how I use social media. The idea was to boost traffic to my website to get people to:

  1. Read my blog
  2. Hire me as a speaker
  3. Purchase artwork
  4. Inquire about freelance work as a writer and/or artist

Are my goals being met? They are not! I am not driving traffic to my website via social media. I made some immediate changes.

Greyhairs Rising blog posts and images of my artwork will no longer be posted on social media other than Linkedin and Twitter.

  • Linkedin because the site offers job information and professional networking opportunities
  • Twitter because I like it. (But no more artwork!) I like Twitter because I can EASILY find people, information, and businesses I’m looking for by hashtag

I don’t know about you, but I don’t have money for legal fees and big corporations have lawyers on staff. It’s a no-brainer for me to step back and review what I’m doing on social media.

Another lesson learned. Another lesson shared. Have a great week. I hope it’s filled with sunshine and summer-like temperatures.

Creative prompt.

Write or draw a paragraph or image of social media in action. How it hurts. How it helps.

Next week’s topic: Craft vs Fine Art

See you back here next Sunday night! Would you like to keep up with the Greyhairs Rising community? Sign up for the latest updates.

mefuller.com #amwriting #amblogging #ampainting

 

 

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Review.

Last week I shared some thoughts on traveling to artist communities to find other artists and to be inspired by their work. This week I’m encouraging you to support your fellow artists.

Here are a few ways to do that.

  • Following their blogs
    • Start with five and keep up! Show your support with comments.
  • Going to art shows and encouraging the artists you find there.
    • Check local listings for art events and make a plan to attend as many as you can.
  • Network through social media or community groups
    • Make a list of social media outlets and your local art groups.
  • Join art organizations
    • What are they?
  • Attend artist performances
    • Where are they?
  • Read local authors
    • Who are they?

What else can you do to help support other artists? Please share with us through comments or in the Greyhairs Rising Facebook group.

Creative prompt.

I feel supported by other artists when I …

 

Next week’s topic:  Social media

See you back here next Sunday night!

Would you like to keep up with the Greyhairs Rising community? Sign up for the latest updates.

Join our Greyhairs Rising Facebook group.

 

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Are you planning an early summer vacation?

Why not plan an artist community tour of your state or a neighboring state? Last February, my husband and I took a trip through Wisconsin, specifically to visit towns and cities that are known as destinations for artists and art lovers.

We kicked off in Madison, then visited in Mineral Point, and Cedarburg. Our purpose for the trip was two-fold. First, I was hungry to meet new artists and see work new to me. Secondly, we were looking for small towns or accessible cities where we might retire.  We met wonderful people. There wasn’t a town or city that was crossed off our list. We may yet become Wisconsonites!

PinkLlama

Pink Llama Gallery, Cedarburg, WI

Review.

I talked about the courage of your convictions – sending your work out into the world. Since then I have received one rejection from a cold query and two requests from my pitch, to send a query letter and a portion of the manuscript for “Saving the Ghost.” How about you? Did you venture out into the world of critics?

Finding other artists.

  • Select a region near to you or one you’d like to Make inquiries with the local Chamber of Commerce or art council (through online searches) to gather as much information as you can on artists and galleries in the places you plan to visit.
    • Don’t be shy. When you enter a new space or community, talk to people, let them know why you’re visiting their area and what you’d like to see. The locals can offer even more details that can make you visit worthwhile.
  • Look online for artist groups
    • search hashtags on Twitter – whether for artists, galleries, writers, publishers, and agents – whatever your interest.
    • Join Facebook groups specific to your interests
    • Use other social media platforms, including Pinterest, Instagram, and Tumblr
  • Find out if your state has an online arts organization and participate.

 

Have fun and good hunting!

 

 

Creative prompt.

If I’d only known then, what I know now, I’d…

 

Next week’s topic:  Support other artists

See you back here next Sunday night!

Would you like to keep up with the Greyhairs Rising community? Sign up for the latest updates.

Join our Greyhairs Rising Facebook group.

 

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