Tag: fiction

2017 BWA Writing Contest and Fall Festival

ATTEND BWA FALL FESTIVAL and BOOK FAIR

October 28, 2017

Where: Northland Arboretum
Time: 9:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Registration begins at 9:00 a.m.
See details on how to register, below.

Minnesota Writers – CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Submit your original work to the annual BWA writing contest.
See details on how to submit, below.

Book Fair Vendors

$5 for 1/3 of an 8-foot table space to sell your books.
Space is limited. Be sure to mention you’d like a spot when registering.

2017 BWA contest guidelines

  2017-BWA-FestivalPoster

 

2017 BWA Fall Festival Speaker, Faith Sullivan

“Aiming for Excellence: A Little Better Every Day

Faith Sullivan was born and raised in southern Minnesota. Married to drama critic Dan Sullivan, she lived twenty-some years in New York and Los Angeles, returning to Minnesota often to keep her roots planted in the prairie. She is the author of Good Night, Mr. Wodehouse (2015), Gardenias (2005),  What a Woman Must Do (2002), The Empress of One (1997), The Cape Ann (1988), Mrs. Demming and The Mythical Beast (1986), Watchdog (1982) and Repent, Lanny Merkel (1981). A “demon gardener, flea marketer, and feeder of birds,” Sullivan lives in Minneapolis with her husband. They have three grown children. For more information, please visit her website. Photo credit: Leila_Navidi   faithsullivan.com

Brainerd Writers Alliance 2017 Writing Contest

GUIDELINES and INFORMATION

This contest is open to all writers who are residents of Minnesota.

CATEGORIES

Fiction: 2500 word limit.

Tips: Stories need a strong hook to get the reader into the first scene; good development of character and scene interwoven with action; clear rising action to a turning point and resolution; consistent point of view; theme or story idea is clear by end.

Creative nonfiction: 2500 word limit.

  • Memoir stories use fiction guidelines above but are based on actual events.
  • Essay should concern an issue but still have a hook and be developed using examples, narrative, cause-effect, or comparison-contrast; rising action to a climax – arguments get stronger to the turning point; and come to a clear conclusion.

Poetry: 3 poem limit (each poem limited to maximum 40 lines).

  • Poems need strong imagery that enhances the theme or emotion. Robert Frost said, “Poems should begin with delight and end with wisdom.”

FEE TO SUBMIT

$15.00 –  entry in fiction or nonfiction categories.

$15.00 – one to three poems in the poetry category.

ELIGIBILITY

Contest is open to writers who are residents of Minnesota. Work must be submitter’s original, not previously awarded, and unpublished.

DEADLINE and NOTIFICATION

Entries due postmarked August 30, 2017 (no metered mail) or before; winners will be notified by Sept. 30th.

HOW TO SUBMIT

  • Cover letter, separate from entry, to include
    • Name and contact info (address, phone, email)
    • List entry titles with category and word count. Example: “Olivia” – creative nonfiction – 2,455 words.
  • $15 entry fee per entry check made out to BWA
  • Two (2) typed copies of each entry
  • All entries must be typed on standard 8 ½ x 11 paper
  • Use 12 pt. Times New Roman font or similar, double-spaced / Poetry may be single- or double-spaced
  • Fiction and creative nonfiction include – title, category, and word count on top of each page; double-spaced, DO NOT INCLUDE YOUR NAME.
  • Poetry include – title at the top of the page, DO NOT INCLUDE YOUR NAME.
  • Submit by August 30, 2017
  • Postal mail entries to: BWA Writing Contest, 30755 Old Hwy 371, Pequot Lakes, MN 56472

PRIZES

Prizes are $75 for first place and $50 for second place and free entry to 2017 Fall Writers Festival. Winners will be notified after September 30, 2017 and are invited to read at the festival. Prizes will be awarded at the festival or by mail after the festival.

OTHER NOTES

  • Winning entries will not be put on our website or published in any way, so that they may be submitted later as “not previously published” in magazines, anthologies, etc.
  • Our judges are skilled in the writing craft. We encourage them to attend the festival and give comments on the winning entries.
  • All contest entrants are encouraged to attend the BWA Fall Writers Festival October 28th at the Northland Arboretum.

ATTEND BWA FALL WRITERS FESTIVAL

  • A separate fee of $25 for the Festival includes a catered lunch.
  • Reservations are due on or before Oct. 25th.
  • To reserve your spot, send $25.00 check payable to BWA
    • Postal Mail: 6584 Parkview Circle, Baxter, MN 56425
    • Email: brainerdwriters@gmail.com, attn.: Bev, with your RSVP and pay at the door.

BOOK FAIR VENDORS: $5 for 1/3 of an 8-foot table space to sell your books. Space is limited. Be sure to mention you’d like a spot when registering.

Contact Contest Chair Bev Abear with questions at brainerdwriters@gmail.com

Check our website for updates on our Fall Writers Festival: www.brainerdwriters.com

Share This:

Week 30. Cirenaica with Nickolas Butler

This week I will be in residency at Cirenaica, outside of Eau Claire, WI, with author Nickolas Butler and ten other fiction writers. This will be my first residency experience. I’m grateful to have been accepted. I’m eager to work and critique among other writers, off by ourselves in the wilds of Wisconsin farmland – eating, drinking, sleeping, talking, and working fiction.

Nickolas Butler, credit: Chippewa Valley Writer's Guild

Nickolas Butler. Photo credit: Chippewa Valley Writer’s Guild

Before I go much further, I have to thank the Cirenaica Residency Coordinator and author, B. J. Hollars, for his accommodating nature. It is a fact, friends, that we retirees have likely developed certain lifestyle sensitivities and limitations. We don’t want to stop ourselves from enjoying the most that life has to offer but face it, some of our choices may be relegated to the senior menu. B. J. – who I originally thought through email exchanges was a woman in her mid-fifties – is a bright and friendly young man who would do well in the hospitality industry. As my mother used to advise me, artists must always have a real skill to fall back on.

B. J. Hollars Photo credit: B. J. Hollars

B. J. Hollars Photo credit: B. J. Hollars

Listen to his podcast and be charmed. And listen to Nickolas Butler read from “Shotgun Lovesongs,” within the stunning review by Janet Maslin March of the New York Times.

I didn’t know that artist residencies were “a thing” when I stepped into my retirement career as a writer. Some people, I understand, spend their retirement jumping from cruise ship to cruise ship, or house sitting for professors on sabbatical in college towns. Others, writer and artist others, can be mapped across residencies – coast to coast – in country villages to western-ranging dude ranches.

Some residencies are in-house, pay-your-way workshops, offering teaching opportunities from an established artist. Some will invite you to stay as the artist in residency and provide a small stipend for expenses. All will feed you and house you and teach you in a pod of artists, charging the air you breathe with creative fire.

Length of stay varies. Do your research. Apply liberally.

A note on Cirenaica

The Chippewa Valley Writers Guild is pleased to partner with Cirenaica for our second year of summer residencies!  Nestled on 43 acres of hills, farmland, and forest near the quaint village of Fall Creek, Wisconsin, our residencies promise participants of all levels and genres an intensive yet rejuvenating experience amidst an inspiring backdrop.

Next week’s topic: Probably a review of the Nickolas Butler’s Theory and Practice of Fiction Residency

See you back here next Sunday (or some day during the week). Would you like to keep up with the Greyhairs Rising community? Sign up for the latest updates.

 

 

Share This:

Many great writers/artists have been, maybe are, probably will be, depressed, grieving, alcoholic and otherwise addicted to one thing or another. A mind in pain is free to express from the depths of emotion and imagination without concern for rules of civility or convention. Suffering may be the life spring of creation.

I find as I write difficult and complicated personalities, that my thoughts want to interrupt a dive to the depths of feeling or impulse. If I let my mind loose to roam through the expanse of possibilities for human behavior, the result is authenticity. If I try to control what a character may do or say or feel or think, I have limited his or her range and I may never find the true personality I intend to express.

Emotional and mental stability can be hard won for those who have been battered and bashed by life. Is stability worth the price of creativity lost? One does not need to be exclusive of the other. If a writer with a happy home life and a promising future wants to write an authentic bad ass character, it can be done without risk if stability is not attached to external rules or social agreement.

The battle to breach the fortress of convention is as fierce as the fight to remain sane and happy – two sides of the same coin. The experience of life for a human being cannot be reduced to a homogenous truth – one size fits all. If your writing expresses one value than your characters will be lacking color, flavor, dimension, and soul.

Experiment with your imagination – see how far it will let you go before you yank your characters back from danger or destruction. When you pull back is when you take over and your character ceases to exist, destined to become nothing more than a paper doll.

 

Share This: