M E Fuller

Community theater and stunning photography

In March, my husband and I, with my two BFFs in tow, traveled to Northfield, MN to see a homespun production of a community theater play written by my editor, Peggy Sheldon. I wanted to see what writing for a local audience could look like in a production.

Best Friends Forever (and Martinis)

Best Friends Forever (and Martinis)

I highly recommend giving this a shot when you need a break from the intensity of writing your novels or pressures from deadlines for articles. Write a slapstick comedy or a silly murder mystery, take it to your community theater group, and produce!

The Case of the Tawdry Tabloid

Sheldon invited audience participation. She provided a script and cues for the willing. One of my friends who was reluctant to act a part was recruited as a flapper in the end. The play was presented as dinner theater with hors d’oeuvres and drinks beforehand and a tasty entree was consumed before the play began.

Get your writing group together to create a play, talk it up to community actors, and HAVE A BLAST!

The Case of the Tawdry Tabloid

The Case of the Tawdry Tabloid

Since we were traveling to Northfield, I took a look online to see what else may be going on in the town. We found that Perlman Teaching Museum at Carleton College was exhibiting Irish photographers’ images of the changing landscape of Ireland.

Post Picturesque-Photographing Ireland

Post Picturesque-Photographing Ireland

Post-Picturesque: Photographing Ireland presents nine accomplished artists, resident in the Republic and Northern Ireland, who respond to the famously picturesque Irish rural landscape with new aesthetic and critical approaches. This ambitious exhibition, curated by Perlman Teaching Museum Director Laurel Bradley, introduces the following lens-based practitioners to American audiences — many for the first time: Gary Coyle, Martin Cregg, David Farrell, Paul Gaffney, Anthony Haughey, Miriam O’Connor, Jill Quigley, Anna Rackard and Ruby Wallis.https://apps.carleton.edu/museum/ireland/

We were all awed by the portraits exhibited by Anna Rackard, “Farmers.” Here’s an example (see more on her page “Farmers.”):

Portrait of Betty Giltrap, Anna Rackard, Photographer

Portrait of Betty Giltrap, Anna Rackard, Photographer

My husband and I left my friends in St. Paul and traveled on to Green Bay, WI to attend an Irish Genealogy presentation by the Ulster Historical Foundation, at the Brown County Library. Having recently learned that the other half of me is completely Irish, I’ve been searching out the relatives.

Irish genealogy can be tricky to chase because of the fire of 1922 in the National Archives. The story of that is worth a read. ‘All Irish genealogical records were destroyed in the 1922 fire’: Myth or fact? Now that I know where my Boddy’s are buried, quite literally, I can’t seem to learn enough about their parish and townland. I hope to be able to report to you in a year or so, from the very soil my ancestors once hoed and trod upon.

So that was March. Maybe in May, I’ll get around to sharing our April adventures! They’re not over yet to be sure.

Happy Spring!

 

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